Awards

  • 1997 : 14th Exhibition of Contemporary Art by Young Artists, Bangkok, TH, ‘Special Prize’
  • 1997 : 43rd National Exhibition of Art, Bangkok, TH, ‘Bronze Medal Award, ‘Graphic Art Section’

Solo Exhibitions

  • 2022 Manycuts artspace, ‘Cerpuscule’ an art exhibition, Chachoengsao, TH
  • 2016 Gallery Ver, ‘Notopia’ an collaborated exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2014 H Project Space, “Fault Line” an art exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2013 Gallery Ver, “Disconnection” an art exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2012 Pongnoi Art space, “Detachment” an art exhibition, Chiangmai, TH
  • 2011 Art Center, Chulalongkorn University “Slow down” an art exhibition, TH
  • 2009 Gallery Ver, “Subsconciouscape” an interactive art exhibition, TH
  • 2007 PSG art gallery, Silpakorn University “Sorry” an interactive art exhibition, TH
  • 2005 Rajata Art House, Bangkok, “Animated Diary” a process documentary art project, TH


Group Exhibitions

  • 2018. Many cuts art space, ‘Cityscape V0l.1’, Chachoengsao, TH
  • 2017. BACC, ‘Earth-Water-Forest-Air’, Bangkok, TH
  • 2016. Sky walk, THE RATCHAPRASONG ART MAZE, URBAN BY NATURE, Bangkok, TH
  • 2012 DAVID store, “dada – simple comme bonjour” an art show, Gent, BE
  • 2012 Bangkok Art and Cultural Center, “Thai-Trend” an art exhibition, TH
  • 2012 Artereal Gallery, “Northern Light” an art exhibition, Sydney, AUS
  • 2011 Gallery See Scape, “Light Space Project” an international art exhibition, Chiangmai, TH
  • 2011 Artery Post Modern Art Gallery, “Art 20 Kg” an art exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2011 Seoul Art Center, “Rainbow Asia” an art exhibition, Seoul, KR
  • 2010 Bangkok Art and Culture Center, “Imagine Peace” an art exhibition, TH


Residencies/fellowships/stipends

  • 2013 ‘Supported by “San Art Laboratory”, Ho Chin Minh City, VN
  • 2007 ‘Supported by Office of Contemporary Arts, Ministry of Culture, TH
  • 2005 ‘Supported by “Lijing Studio”, Kunming, CN
  • 2004 ‘Supported by Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs/DCO/IC’ and Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, NL
  • 2003 ‘Supported by Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs/DCO/IC’
  • 2003 Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten / Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, NL
  • 2002 Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten / Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, NL

Noraset Vaisayakul

— Modern Thai Artist

As an artist, Noraset Vaisayakul tackles both his creative work and a full time day job. Having worked in the construction field, his job requires him to live with other workers in a small house where the construction site lies. He describes the room as a very tight space: “I couldn’t breathe, let alone live there,” Vaisayakul recalls. After five days and nights of living in the room, it came to a surprise that he actually started to like it. It became a place for him to wind down, despite all the chaos and noise from the construction site. When it came time to leave, he was sad to leave the room. For the artist, this was a test of resilience and tolerance. It proved to him that one should adapt to a certain situation, rather than blaming the surroundings – this led to a level of appreciation and contentment for him and became the starting point of his philosophy. “Even the most horrible, ugliest picture; if you see it for 10 consecutive days, you would end up finding it decent-looking, if not beautiful,” He added, “There’s no higher or lower, you can adapt to the situation when it comes. Maybe if other people would realize that, the world would be a more peaceful place.”

Concept

In his art practice, the artist wants to communicate the notion that everything (in all aspects) is connected and nothing happens by chance. He holds his firm belief that the uncovering of hidden truths and meanings is the process of overcoming fear. “I want to not only create my own space, I want to let people see the world with another perspective. I do believe what we’re living now, it’s not real. I cannot say it for sure, nor deny it, because I have to learn more about it. I have to understand it. But that’s precisely what I’m doing through art,” Vaisayakul states.

By creating his paintings, whether it’d be digitally or on canvas, Vaisayakul paints with intention. With the strong mindset that all fear is connected to hate. “You hate another person because you fear them, often without realizing it,” says Vaisayakul. He raises an example: in 200 at PSG Gallery, Silpakorn University the artist exhibited two rooms connected by corridors and built a blue screen system connecting the two spaces. When people entered the first room, it would be found empty, but the people who were in the second room were able to see the people in the first room through a video, showing them in horrible scenarios. The people in the first room of course were oblivious to this so they were happy in the room, even playing with the camera – the art lies within the paradox. The people in the second room saw happiness amongst chaos.

Previously, Vaisayakul directed his focus to a different life concept: balance. “In my research, I have found most of my compulsive behaviors came from an internal problem, not so much my surroundings. I developed a framework called ‘the distorted mental state’,” Vaisayakul explains. Tackling the issue of mental illness, he starts with evolution. The destruction of our mental state comes from within ourselves and others — we create problems for ourselves. “I’ll try to give my take on the development of the character of modern mankind, who to me is so selfish, violent and weak. It’s a process of self-inquiry that will speak volumes about us all.”

When it comes to his paintings, Noraset makes sure to communicate his thoughts on the social structure in his country, Thailand. “I like to keep up with social situations that happen in Thailand for my entire life. I found that the problem of many aspects that intercept any kind of developments is social inequality,” He tells us. The inequality in Thailand shows in different cases: the economic chance, knowledge accessibility, choice of jobber, and freedom of speech to the main idea, injustice.

“The authoritarianism of this country has established certain ways of thinking to maintain power and keep their economic benefit. They’ve created this nonsense moral system for an ‘socially equal society’ or asserted old traditions which destroys the value of equality in many aspects of society — also blocking diversity in general,” he voices.

To the artist, we are all imprisoned in a superstition-based society. “I am interested in unlocking people from misunderstanding. I am a freeman who believes in the standard human right, including the right to dream of a better life,” Noraset states. In his artwork he uses symbols and iconography as a ‘signifier of belief’ in a way that teases the subject respectfully. He sees these pictures in Thai politics as well, so having this connection allows the same elements to fit in different perspectives. He says, “In one way or another, people who are pressed over this subject either knew or will know themselves. Everyone feels uncomfortable like this”. With that said, his artworks are meant to be a ‘breath of fresh air’ for people who struggle to share their opinions on this topic. “By showing ordinary aspects in our life that in fact aren’t normal at all, I try to tell this story and piece of history to anyone in this society so we can defend ourselves in this politically corrupt society,” He says with determination.

As Michel Foucault said: “Prison continues, on those who are entrusted to it, a work begun elsewhere, which the whole of society pursues on each individual through innumerable mechanisms of discipline”.

Noraset Vaisayakul

— Modern Thai Artist

As an artist, Noraset Vaisayakul tackles both his creative work and a full time day job. Having worked in the construction field, his job requires him to live with other workers in a small house where the construction site lies. He describes the room as a very tight space: “I couldn’t breathe, let alone live there,” Vaisayakul recalls. After five days and nights of living in the room, it came to a surprise that he actually started to like it. It became a place for him to wind down, despite all the chaos and noise from the construction site. When it came time to leave, he was sad to leave the room. For the artist, this was a test of resilience and tolerance. It proved to him that one should adapt to a certain situation, rather than blaming the surroundings – this led to a level of appreciation and contentment for him and became the starting point of his philosophy. “Even the most horrible, ugliest picture; if you see it for 10 consecutive days, you would end up finding it decent-looking, if not beautiful,” He added, “There’s no higher or lower, you can adapt to the situation when it comes. Maybe if other people would realize that, the world would be a more peaceful place.”

Concept

In his art practice, the artist wants to communicate the notion that everything (in all aspects) is connected and nothing happens by chance. He holds his firm belief that the uncovering of hidden truths and meanings is the process of overcoming fear. “I want to not only create my own space, I want to let people see the world with another perspective. I do believe what we’re living now, it’s not real. I cannot say it for sure, nor deny it, because I have to learn more about it. I have to understand it. But that’s precisely what I’m doing through art,” Vaisayakul states.

By creating his paintings, whether it’d be digitally or on canvas, Vaisayakul paints with intention. With the strong mindset that all fear is connected to hate. “You hate another person because you fear them, often without realizing it,” says Vaisayakul. He raises an example: in 200 at PSG Gallery, Silpakorn University the artist exhibited two rooms connected by corridors and built a blue screen system connecting the two spaces. When people entered the first room, it would be found empty, but the people who were in the second room were able to see the people in the first room through a video, showing them in horrible scenarios. The people in the first room of course were oblivious to this so they were happy in the room, even playing with the camera – the art lies within the paradox. The people in the second room saw happiness amongst chaos.

Previously, Vaisayakul directed his focus to a different life concept: balance. “In my research, I have found most of my compulsive behaviors came from an internal problem, not so much my surroundings. I developed a framework called ‘the distorted mental state’,” Vaisayakul explains. Tackling the issue of mental illness, he starts with evolution. The destruction of our mental state comes from within ourselves and others — we create problems for ourselves. “I’ll try to give my take on the development of the character of modern mankind, who to me is so selfish, violent and weak. It’s a process of self-inquiry that will speak volumes about us all.”

When it comes to his paintings, Noraset makes sure to communicate his thoughts on the social structure in his country, Thailand. “I like to keep up with social situations that happen in Thailand for my entire life. I found that the problem of many aspects that intercept any kind of developments is social inequality,” He tells us. The inequality in Thailand shows in different cases: the economic chance, knowledge accessibility, choice of jobber, and freedom of speech to the main idea, injustice.

“The authoritarianism of this country has established certain ways of thinking to maintain power and keep their economic benefit. They’ve created this nonsense moral system for an ‘socially equal society’ or asserted old traditions which destroys the value of equality in many aspects of society — also blocking diversity in general,” he voices.

To the artist, we are all imprisoned in a superstition-based society. “I am interested in unlocking people from misunderstanding. I am a freeman who believes in the standard human right, including the right to dream of a better life,” Noraset states. In his artwork he uses symbols and iconography as a ‘signifier of belief’ in a way that teases the subject respectfully. He sees these pictures in Thai politics as well, so having this connection allows the same elements to fit in different perspectives. He says, “In one way or another, people who are pressed over this subject either knew or will know themselves. Everyone feels uncomfortable like this”. With that said, his artworks are meant to be a ‘breath of fresh air’ for people who struggle to share their opinions on this topic. “By showing ordinary aspects in our life that in fact aren’t normal at all, I try to tell this story and piece of history to anyone in this society so we can defend ourselves in this politically corrupt society,” He says with determination.

As Michel Foucault said: “Prison continues, on those who are entrusted to it, a work begun elsewhere, which the whole of society pursues on each individual through innumerable mechanisms of discipline”.

Awards

  • 1997 : 14th Exhibition of Contemporary Art by Young Artists, Bangkok, TH, ‘Special Prize’
  • 1997 : 43rd National Exhibition of Art, Bangkok, TH, ‘Bronze Medal Award, ‘Graphic Art Section’

Solo Exhibitions

  • 2022 Manycuts artspace, ‘Cerpuscule’ an art exhibition, Chachoengsao, TH
  • 2016 Gallery Ver, ‘Notopia’ an collaborated exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2014 H Project Space, “Fault Line” an art exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2013 Gallery Ver, “Disconnection” an art exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2012 Pongnoi Art space, “Detachment” an art exhibition, Chiangmai, TH
  • 2011 Art Center, Chulalongkorn University “Slow down” an art exhibition, TH
  • 2009 Gallery Ver, “Subsconciouscape” an interactive art exhibition, TH
  • 2007 PSG art gallery, Silpakorn University “Sorry” an interactive art exhibition, TH
  • 2005 Rajata Art House, Bangkok, “Animated Diary” a process documentary art project, TH


Group Exhibitions

  • 2018. Many cuts art space, ‘Cityscape V0l.1’, Chachoengsao, TH
  • 2017. BACC, ‘Earth-Water-Forest-Air’, Bangkok, TH
  • 2016. Sky walk, THE RATCHAPRASONG ART MAZE, URBAN BY NATURE, Bangkok, TH
  • 2012 DAVID store, “dada – simple comme bonjour” an art show, Gent, BE
  • 2012 Bangkok Art and Cultural Center, “Thai-Trend” an art exhibition, TH
  • 2012 Artereal Gallery, “Northern Light” an art exhibition, Sydney, AUS
  • 2011 Gallery See Scape, “Light Space Project” an international art exhibition, Chiangmai, TH
  • 2011 Artery Post Modern Art Gallery, “Art 20 Kg” an art exhibition, Bangkok, TH
  • 2011 Seoul Art Center, “Rainbow Asia” an art exhibition, Seoul, KR
  • 2010 Bangkok Art and Culture Center, “Imagine Peace” an art exhibition, TH


Residencies/fellowships/stipends

  • 2013 ‘Supported by “San Art Laboratory”, Ho Chin Minh City, VN
  • 2007 ‘Supported by Office of Contemporary Arts, Ministry of Culture, TH
  • 2005 ‘Supported by “Lijing Studio”, Kunming, CN
  • 2004 ‘Supported by Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs/DCO/IC’ and Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, NL
  • 2003 ‘Supported by Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs/DCO/IC’
  • 2003 Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten / Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, NL
  • 2002 Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten / Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, NL